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20130121
20130129
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.7% of national income for jobs, training, education, for all the infrastructure, the environment, climate, technology, and forgetting who government? this is the hard truth, and what is likely to happen is to solidify this, because no one is speaking out for the government. we are talking about protecting entitlements. we are squeezing to nothing. the top do not pay. they have been given every way to get their money out tax-free, and it is trillions of dollars that have been lost in addition to what has been wasted in the censored wars. >> if i can get some quick response, jeffrey sachs was saying a while ago there is a bipartisan consensus that the poor do not matter, so they end up being more invisible. what is troubling for so many of us, you talk about a guy like lyndon johnson who made it very clear he knew he was writing off the south for the next 30 or 40 years by pushing the kinds of programs he pushed, the war on poverty. let me ask you a question i was going to ask the congress wouldn't -- the congresswoman. i will ask you, have the democrats abandoned for people -- poor people?
's working and what's not. >> we seem to think that education's a thing, like a vaccine that can be designed from afar and simply injected into our children. >> the embattled oakland police department brings on an expensive consultant, but his tough tactics are generating controversy. >> i vote against this contract tonight is not about not being serious about crime. >> apple stock takes a plunge. it's something taking a bite out of innovation at the silicon valley giant. >>> plus. i'm here at the new sfja strzz center in san francisco. we'll go on a behind the scenes tour to find out what makes this place so groundbreaking. coming up. >>> good evening. welcome to "this week in northern california." it's been an eventful week with the governor's address from the state capital, emotions running high in oakland. not to mention a new one of a kind arts institution celebrating a grand opening in san francisco. we have much to get to. let's begin by introducing our panelists. joining me tonight, matthai kuruvila, "san francisco chronicle" reporter. jolie o'dell, of venturebeat.com. as well as joh
you. thank you. >> where do began. no matter whether you know about education or not, let's turn to the banking world. investing in very young children is the best investment you can make. it has the greatest return on investment, and we know that because the first three years of life for the most important for cognitive, social, and emotional development. you are only two years old ones. that is the most significant window of time, and i think there must be an incident or a toddler in here, which brings me to the next point, yes we have class warfare, but it is unusual class warfare. those who are poor are completely left out. it is a bipartisan effort to keep people who are pouring out of the national dialogue. that is why i started witness to hunter, which is working to be able to provide direction testimony on their experiences on raising children in poverty, and i will tell you there are so many conversations. the fact people have been silent for so many years, that is a mass of a trail. the first thing the women who are poor will tell you is that poverty is solvable. they e
of the mlk research and education institute at stanford. he joins us tonight from colorado. always good to have you back on this program. >> great to be with you. tavis: at the king day to you. what do you make of the fact that, on this day, we do not just celebrate the legacy and life of dr. king, but the first african-american president inaugurated for the second time? >> there is so much to celebrate on this day and so much to remember about the part of king's dream that has not been fulfilled. particularly the issue of poverty. there are so many things that make us thankful that the civil- rights reforms were achieved. i think it is important, particularly on this day, to remember that, if king were around, he would be pushing us to deal with that have -- that pestering issue of poverty. tavis: why is it that you think that, with all the evidence supporting the notion that pozner -- the poverty is threatening our democracy, it is a matter of national security, one out of two americans are either in or near poverty, the younger you are, the more likely you are to be in poverty, these
to have the children they want, to educate the children they had and keep them safe. so it really has to do with, how do we define women in our society? are they full and equal participants? and the best way, the seemingly sort of neutral way of undermining their personhood, is to focus on the issue of abortion. >> for us, our slogan is "health, dignity, and justice." and when you think about compulsory pregnancies, it's taking away health, dignity, and justice from a woman. many of the women, the latinas that we work with that have experienced abortion are in their 20s, have a child already, and are -- >> and why do they want an abortion? >> because they're not in an economic situation they -- >> they can't afford a second child? >> they perhaps can't afford a second child, they want to go to school, they might be at a point in their career. the reasons range, quite frankly. it's really important that women that we work with, mostly latina, immigrant, women of color, those at the margins, low income, are able to access their rights in a way without barriers and further bureaucratic o
america. others point to our inferior infrastructure and sub-par public education. but adam segal, author of "advantage," says the big problem is others are gaining ground. >> we have been kind of running in place for the last three or four years because of the recession, spending on r&d, and big ideas seem to be fairly scarce while china just continues to funnel more and more money into it. >> reporter: still many argue the u.s. will always be extremely competitive because we are the most innovative country in the world. what better place to witness innovation at work than at i.b.m. in westchester county, new york. this is the home of watson, big blue's super computer. watson was clever enough to beat "jeopardy" champions at their own game just a few years ago. now, i.b.m. researchers are working on new uses for the brainiac computer, particularly in the field of medicine. bernie meyerson calls himself i.b.m.'s head geek. he says innovation is critical for companies and societies to survive and thrive. and yes, there is a magic ingredient. >> continuity. in the down cycles of the economy
-up hashtag "financial education". that's tomorrow, thursday at 3 pm eastern. susie, we're really looking forward to chatting it up with alisa tomorrow, she's also our kids & cash commentator tomorrow night. that's "nightly business report" for wednesday, january 23. have a great evening, you too susie. >> susie: goodnight tom, thanks for watching everyone. join us online at: www.nbr.com and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> join us anytime at nbr.com. there, you'll find full episodes of the program, complete show transcripts and all the market stats. also follows us on our facebook page at bizrpt. and on twitter @bizrpt.
to put if into effect. in a sizable way. you need more investment in human beings, that's education and so on. you need more investment in physical plant and equipment. and you need to promote technology. >> we're doing all those things, so you know we're not exactly getting a on any of them so it would be nice if we could get a on all of them and then we could do better. but i think it's unrealistic to think that growth is going to do the whole job. >> what about the federal reserve. it has its first meeting this year next week. is there anything more than the fed can do besides keeping interest rates superlow? >> not that much. the fed is more or less restricted to working on interest rates and things that are related, closely related to interest rates. i think really if we're going to get a big push to growth, it's got to come from the government. and believe it or not, i would add have kate another stimulus package. not as big as the of the lamented ones but another one, followed of course, coupled with deficit reduction. you don't want to let the budget just blow up >> susie: h
that will make the next counsel tree that will be america, whether it's education or training or whatever else. i just wanted to give just shout out to the brooklyn tabernacle choir. which i thought was just phenomenal. also lamar alexander, which was really exceptional and the -- not that the others weren't fine but they were. i thought the poet was great. >> that gives us an opportunity to speak more broadly about the ceremony it wasn't just the speech. the speech is at the heart of it, we can come back to that. we'll watch the president, vice president, go in to a room in the capital which they're going to sign the four nominations to the people he has mentioned that he is going to nominate for cabinet. let's see if we can listen in. >> he's going right to work now. >> lamar alexander, chuck schumer, vice president biden. house speaker boehner. eric cantor and nancy pelosi. >> ronald reagan established the tradition of going right to sign these kinds of documents for nominations. >> thank you very much, everybody. >> thank you. [ applause ] >> at a time when we know that washington is d
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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